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Take Off the White Gloves and Become a Change Agent!
Read Complete Post at HuffPost Women The Road to Change In 1968 I attended an all-girls “junior” college in Boston.  I had no idea back then ...
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Ready for Change?
Expand Your Comfort Zone! We all have our comfort zone, a place where we feel comfortable and safe. We are at ease in our routine surroundings, job, ...
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Get Your MOJO Workin
Tips on How to Get Mojovated   (Photo Credit:veryjosie.blog.com) The time is now for our collective MOJO to be resurrected. There are con...
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Worklife For Women

Our blog posts contain information to help you with all the challenges facing you with managing the 24/7 world of work and life today. Please comment and engage in the dialogue as we can all learn from one another's contributions.

Recent blog posts

white gloves

Read Complete Post at HuffPost Women

The Road to Change

In 1968 I attended an all-girls “junior” college in Boston.  I had no idea back then what I wanted to do with my life except to follow the suggested path by the adults in my world and to become a medical secretary, work in a hospital and find a doctor to marry who would take care of me.  Since I had no burning desire or passion to do any one thing, I thought that sounded like a good plan.  In addition, my main goal was to leave the town in CT where I grew up and get to a bigger, college town so Boston was the place to go. Off I went to the lovely Back Bay area of Boston to begin my next chapter.  What I didn’t realize back then was that the opportunities that presented themselves to me during my two year experience would forever change my life. 

As thrilling and exciting this new journey was what I found was that there were more social restrictions in place than I ever experienced at home. Growing up in a non-traditional home with a father who was in show business and a British mother who all my friends thought had a “funny accent”, I was used to a free-wheeling environment with no specific curfew.  In addition, I was the oldest of six children so I was the leader of the club and I become fairly independent.

The school in Boston had a curfew along with other restrictions.  The biggest shock was that there was “tea” time and we were expected to wear white gloves and skirts.  No slacks were allowed in the school at all. This had to change and this is where the learning opportunities began that I still use to this day.  The mission was to abolish the white glove policy!

 

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comfort-zoneExpand Your Comfort Zone!

We all have our comfort zone, a place where we feel comfortable and safe. We are at ease in our routine surroundings, job, community, and relationships.  But here’s the catch - in our ever-changing world, life inside our comfort zone will still be tossed and turned. If we are not prepared to change with the pace of our world, we will find ourselves stuck, or worse, left behind.

 Here’s a good example. Depending on your age, you have had to make changes to the way you listen to music: records, 8-tracks, cassettes, CD’s,MP-3’s. Or what about the phone you have: rotary, push button, remote, cell, and who knows what is next?

We all realize that the world is constantly changing – perhaps faster than most of us desire. So, to be comfortable moving forward, we can engage in some simple habits that prepare us to think and live outside our comfort zone – even if just a little bit at a time i.e. “move a muscle, change a thought”.

  1. Ask these questions: a) What would you do if you could do anything? b) What would you like to learn about? c) What small changes would you like to make in your life?
  1. Change your routine everyday: a) Try a new restaurant or menu item; b) Take a new route to work or school; c) Add a few morning or evening rituals.
  2. Experience something different on a weekly basis: a)  Visit a museum, art store, antique mall, etc.; b) Take a class for personal or professional development; c) Explore a new walking trail or park.

 These simple exercises can help you to stretch your comfort zone. And as we get out of our routine and try on new attitudes, behaviors and perspectives, our thinking grows, our experiences grow, and life grows too.

With the WorkLife Method, we approach change from the perspective that everyone is unique.  We offer coaching and support to help you identify the unique qualities of your personal comfort zone. Contact us to expand your comfort zone and be ready for change! 

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Tips on How to Get Mojovated

 

(Photo Credit:veryjosie.blog.com)

Photo Credit:veryjosie.blog.comThe time is now for our collective MOJO to be resurrected. There are constant references from writers, commentators and even the White House on the topic! Let’s get MOJOVATED!

During the spring, it seems especially pertinent to discuss and focus on how to make some career and life MOJO but also how to find it, keep it and use it moving forward.  Our opinion is that MOJO is unique to each individual and can be better accessed if we know our Passions, Strengths and Needs.  We use The Birkman Method® (as we have for over 20 years) in our coaching to focus the individual on ways to manage their MOJO and to use it to be more effective, energized and satisfied. 

In addition, the “science” of MOJO is deeply connected to symbols, rituals and myths.  We all have talismans and a special object that connects us and reminds us of what is important to us, what we value and for whom we care.   Take a moment to identify and examine your talismans and/or rituals that are the essence of your MOJO and use it to energize and center your actions with clear intention every day.

Sometimes we connect through music sometimes through smells (think home cooked meals) or maybe it is a color or a texture (spring flowers).

We often hear from individuals who are immersed in a de-MOJOVATED workplace and need support with a strategic plan.  We also hear from the solopreneur who needs daily motivation to fuel inspiration. In fact, it's times like these that are perfect opportunities to reboot and refresh. Here are a few suggestions for what to do to kick in mojivation:

 1.  Assess the situationknow what motivates you identifying your interests, articulating your strengths, discover what your environmental needs are and by managing yourGet some insights into your motivations by sampling the Birkman Method® assessment here.

 2.  Create an action plan - Establish clear goals and select the necessary resources you’ll need to take the first step. Decide on a time frame for completion of the goal. Identify the challenges that might de-mojivate you as well as the mojivators.

 3.  Communicate, communicate, communicate - staying mojivated requires reaching out and scheduling frequent opportunities for informal meetings with your supporting network.

 4.  Design a vision and future strategy – always be open to discovering opportunities for the futureAlways be designing your “next” opportunity as opposed to settling for the “best”. 

 So, be sure to take time to assess and reconnect with your MOJO.  Wherever you are, wherever you go, don’t forget to “stop and smell the roses”. 

 

 

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3 Ways to Boost Your Confidence with a Plan

 

small-girl-soccerNo one can deny that in order to succeed at anything you need a plan.  How many times have you attempted to accomplish something without a plan only to discover that your efforts weren’t successful?  In the theatre world this would be the script.  Can you imagine an actor stepping on the stage for a performance without a script? Even improvisational theatre has a loosely structured plan to follow.  In business, however, I often hear from clients who are amazed that their efforts didn’t amount to anything or their well-intentioned efforts failed.  The saddest complaint is when the individual’s career has plateaued and they don’t know why. The answer usually lies in the fact that they had never created a development plan for their career.  That plan should include measurable metrics, a vision, and a solid network to access.  

How does having a plan boost your confidence?  Preparing a plan forces you to select the steps you need to take to make it happen.  The plan starts to shape your “script” and sets your course for moving forward.  With a few steps in place your confidence meter starts to rise.  Here are a few suggestions to get you started:

1) Make a plan – The most overlooked part of setting goals is ironically the process of setting theIt’s not about the goal in and of itself but about the purpose and clarity it gives to your actions.  The fundamental value in coaching is not whether you reach the goal as much as it is in refining and bringing clarity to your actions. You may find that the direction changes and new goals appear.  Outline your goals by assessing these3 areas:

  • Overall Health and Well-Being Goals – If you’re not taking care of you the rest of your goals don’t matter. 
  • Short Term Goals – determine your strengths and select the necessary skills for your development. 
  • Long Term Goals – career development – If you could create your perfect career future, what would it look like?

2) Strategic networking - know how to continually access your network:

  • Start with the end in mind and reverse engineer your targets
  • Enlist the help of any productive partnerships or mentors you’ve had.

3) Present your best self and speak with authority:

  • Practice good listening skills.
  • Have a clear core message or “pitch”.
  • Use open-ended, facilitative questions.

As a moderator at a recent conference, the theme was focused on encouraging risk-taking, finding champions, and expressing missions.  These concepts are critical for thriving and prospering whether a small business owner or an internal contributor. 

My takeaway from the day was the importance of having a plan. Not necessarily a business plan but a plan! You can’t take action and move forward without a clear plan that aligns with your personal vision and purpose.   Planning your work and working your plan, sets the wheels in motion for taking risks, finding champions/mentors and expressing your personal direction.

Oh, and by the way - stop and celebrate your success along the way and most importantly track the challenges that led to breakthroughs.  We’ve been conditioned that getting the “A” is the most important thing when equally as important is learning from our mistakes, took a detour, and possibly fumbled along the way.  These admissions will get you back on your personal success track, get you closer to your goals and ultimately boost your confidence.

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Image from Bad 25 Album ArtMJ Bad 25

Another installment in the series A More Confident You!

Yes, I’m referring to THE Michael Jackson.  Recently I saw Bad 25 which is a 2012 documentary film about the 25th anniversary of Michael Jackson's 1987 album directed and co-produced by Spike Lee. What struck me most about the documentary, in addition of course to the amazing talent, was how many people launched their careers by working with Jackson.  In addition to all the talented choreographers and musicians, Sheryl Crow was a backup vocalist during his Bad World Tour from 1987–1989. Wesley Snipes appeared as Michael Jackson’s nemesis in the Martin Scorsese-directed music video "Bad" in 1987. Bad was the third, and final, musical collaboration between Jackson and Quincy Jones. The album was produced by Jones, with co-production credit given to Jackson.

What great leaders do is surround themselves with others who have the skills and talents to enhance what they already possess. They also have a clear vision of where they’re going and what they want to accomplish. Certainly Jackson had a clear artistic vision and knew the direction he wanted to take with his art. He made sure that he collaborated with others who had that special something extra that would motivate him to accomplish what he set out to do.  AND….he was constantly rearranging and enhancing his work long after everyone else called it quits for the day or night.

The concept of rehearsal is in the DNA of the artist.  Without it there wouldn’t be a professional performance.  In other words, practice makes perfect and builds confidence.  When it comes to your personal development how often do you step back, reflect, ask for feedback and rehearse before launching into the next project, or work/life move? In business, the professional product is expected to be delivered without rehearsal time. The rehearsal resides in taking the time to answer four powerful questions – Who Am I? What do I want? Where am I going? How do I get there?  Wouldn’t the result be much better if you created the opportunity to practice and rehearse along the way? Do you start building momentum and then stop?

Getting back to Michael Jackson and leadership, artists rehearse constantly to perfect their art – business leaders, not so common. Rehearsal in business lies in the ability for the individual to become self-directed.  Choices should be initiated by the individual, discussed and ratified with the manager and supported by the organization. Consider this the rehearsal.  It all starts with surrounding yourself with great talent who aren’t afraid to critique your performance and provide you with constructive feedback.  The leader accepts the information and creates a plan to move forward.  Practice using the opportunity to create your own development script, select a cast of characters to help you and rehearse until you’ve acquired the competencies you’re striving for.  Our organization has developed a “rehearsal” tool that will help you to reflect on your successes and translate them into your personal motivational stories. 

Ask yourself these questions:

How can I incorporate a rehearsal strategy into my work and life?

What do I need in order to start?

What are the work and life stories that I can incorporate into my rehearsals?

If you need support with how to start a rehearsal strategy contact me – This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Let me know how you’re rehearsal practice is going.

In the meantime, take a break and watch Michael Jackson rehearsing in his studio. Great footage of the infamous moonwalk:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awm3VRu2HFM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Empathy HandsIn the wake of the Newtown tragedy I feel compelled to express my condolences to the victims' families as well as to our entire nation.  We have all felt this loss and if you're like me, struggle with what to do and how to help.  This recent event underscores for me the importance of understanding and managing yourself and your emotions.  It's critical in this crazy, mixed up world today that we understand how to build empathy and to better understand others.

I was struck by President Obama's scripture reference to the "unseen" in his speech during the interfaith service on Sunday in Newtown, Ct. "So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal." Coaching is our way of helping people access the "unseen world" of emotional intelligence (EQ).  When I think about the aftereffects of the Newtown tragedy, I'm grateful for the opportunity to give back to the world the gift of helping people build their emotional intelligence.  This goes beyond the development of skills to complete a task and speaks to the importance of building empathy and enhancing our relationships with others.

 

As I was completing my Organizational Communication degree in 2004, I was asked to write a time capsule letter that would be read by someone in my company in the year 2050. Surprisingly, the letter was about the development of an Empathy Center.

 

The events of Newtown have inspired me to share my message of building empathy and supporting social change.  Embarking on the journey of self-discovery requires discipline, methods and tools.  One of the best tools we've found is The BirkmanClick here for additional information and to view sample reports.

 

Although the Newtown disaster is still fresh on our minds, let’s try throughout this holiday season and beyond to follow what Ann Curry of NBC has started with the 26 acts of kindness initiative http://nbcnews.to/XGmdz1 support someone in times of need, create a daily gratitude journal no matter how trying the day may be, love a little more, practice patience and tenderness, and become an ambassador of your personal values as you interact with your families, your communities and beyond.  May 2013 provide us with increased hope that the world can be a better place because of our commitment to promote a world filled with increased EQ but more importantly a world with more empathy.  

 

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Woman Leaping
Confidence and You


Think of a recent social or business gathering you attended. Who were the people that projected confidence? You probably remember them well because confident people radiate a warmth and enthusiasm that draws people toward them. They approach these occasions as opportunities to meet, greet and grow. Less confident people, however, generally hide in the background or stick closely to people they know.

We all yearn to have confidence - to feel as if we belong. Here are a few tips to help you feel confident no matter what you're doing or whom you're with:

 

SmileConfident people smile - they smile with their mouth and their eyes. Their energy is positive. Even when they're nervous inside, they don't show it on their face.


Breathe. If you feel a little anxious around people or situations that are unfamiliar to you, take a few deep breaths to relax. Slow, mindful inhales and exhales lower anxiety and nervousness immediately.

 

Show Interest.  Take the focus off yourself and put it on others by asking thoughtful questions and listening with interest. People with confidence care about others. So always ask, listen and learn. 


Use Positive Self Talk.  Give yourself positive messages, reminding yourself of your strengths, talents and successes.  Recite a simple mantra for when you are feeling anxious or uncertain.


New situations can make anyone feel a bit anxious and uncertain.  By applying these simple tips, you will feel less nervous, more empowered, and more confident.

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Live-Life-Love-Work-cover-imageOur recent WorkLife survey indicated that there are many different areas to focus on when addressing WorkLife challenges. We have the usual predictable responses around time management, career challenges and work/life balance but when we dug deeper the answers were very interesting. Several responses mentioned challenges with communication skills, finding employment, getting motivated, being able to juggle and multi- task, breaking through female stereotypes in various professions, and handling conflict. For most of us, success in our life, our work and our careers depends on how well we can articulate who we are, what we want, where we're going and how we want to get there. Much of our time is spent working with and through other people to accomplish our Work and Life objectives.

How would you assess your ability to live your life and love your work? Yes, it is possible to integrate both and to actually love what you do. In our work with our clients we provide insights, tools and support to help you target your hopes and dreams which ultimately results in creating and aligning a highly effective integration of work and life. It’s important that your talents and skills are being used well and that you have opportunities to expand on those talents and skills. The unique, ever-changing story of your personal and professional life gives us clues to help you determine what you want.  Are you the author of the unfolding story of your life and do you approach each day as an exciting adventure? Is your level of vitality and well-being where you’d like it to be? Take action towards achieving WorkLife integration by answering these four questions on a regular basis:

  • Who Am I? Identify your core work and life values;
  • What Do I Want? Align your career with your passion, articulate your strengths and manage your stress;
  • Where Am I Going? Align your goals with who you are.  Complete your personal Wheel of Life to see which areas you might want to focus on.
  • How Do I Get There? Create short term, long term and well-being goals as well as an action plan for each area.

More than ever, I'm hearing women say, "I don't know how to ask for what I want in my work and life", or, "I don't know what I want to do with my career", or "I don't know how to express myself". Invest in your future by taking the time to identify your strengths and establish short and long term goals. The change will happen and you’ll begin to feel more energized, gain increased enthusiasm and achieve a sense of satisfaction and well-being that may have been missing for quite a while.

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Rather than using the old adage, practice makes perfect, learn to embrace the new mantra, rehearsal leads to a better career performance. 

Rehearsal  RECHARGE YOUR CAREER THROUGH REHEARSAL

 

My Dad was the NBC Nightly News announcer in New York City at 30 Rock during the era of the Huntley-Brinkley news show – long before the Nightly News with Brian Williams of today.  When I was a young girl, I had the privilege of going with my Dad to the studios on several occasions to watch him work. In show business there is a lot of rehearsal and practice. My Dad would be given a script for his part of the show and then he’d get to work by highlighting certain sections, rewriting and editing sections to better fit his style, and then practice, practice, practice.  Why isn’t this standard practice in every business? 

 

How would you assess your performance in your work and life?  Do you allow yourself time for “rehearsal” in each of your performances?  Yes, the various activities, deadlines and challenges you face in both work and life do leave room for the opportunity to rehearse if you target and make a plan.  Creating an Individual Development Plan (IDP) helps you discover how to manage the journey and explore the opportunities that are available.

 

We live in uncertain times.  This uncertainty affects both work and life.  Although there is no certain antidote to uncertainty, one of the best that I have found in my work at WorkLife for Women, is by supporting individual development.  Why is this?  In the absence of certainty in our work and careers, investing time and resources in development has several positive effects:

 

  1. It helps you to focus on possibilities of the future;
  2. It creates a sense of readiness for whatever may happen;
  3. It increases a sense of worth and recognition knowing that the organization acknowledges the value you bring.

We’re not talking about training here.  Training is an investment in skills that are necessary for the present moment.  Development is focused on your future and self-actualization. Studies by Gallup and others have shown conclusively that high engagement by employees is directly related to opportunities to learn and grow and to a sense of a supervisor or manager having discussions that show that “they care about me as a person”, “there is someone at work who encourages my development”, “I have opportunities at work to learn and grow”, and “someone at work has talked to me about my progress”.  These four questions from the core Q12 Gallup questions are all related to and can be addressed with a focus on development. 

 

My philosophy is that development should be self-directed, in other words, the responsibility for choices, rationale and relevance of development choices, should be initiated by the individual, discussed and ratified with the manager and supported by the organization. It is important to experience this learning as a dynamic process where the individual takes charge of her development.  Consider this as the rehearsal. It is not static but may become so when and if the choice becomes to limit personal efforts and leave it on the shelf.  This is meant to be your career and personal development journey.

 

How do you get started?  As you continue on the WorkLife journey, the script would look something like this:

 

  1. Ask for ongoing, informal feedback discussions.  This is where you get to rewrite, edit and practice, practice, practice.
  2. Assess current state and align with two-three developmental goals for the current year. Be sure that each of the following areas is included in the plan.

a.      Overall – health and well-being.

b.      Short-term – necessary skills enhancement.

c.       Long-term – career development.

3.      Discuss your developmental activities and choose books, associations, conferences, mentors, etc. to support your rehearsal strategies.

4.      Commit to utilizing the selected resources, honor your time commitments and most of all keep in mind that it’s all about the rehearsal.

 

Rather than using the old adage, practice makes perfect, learn to embrace the new mantra, rehearsal leads to a better career performance. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

 

 

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FINDING YOUR V.O.I.C.E.

Values, Opportunity, Interests, Commitment, Empowerment

“And…Goodnight for NBC News”. I heard that closing every night. The voice was my dad’s, Bill Hanrahan, an announcer on NBC’s leading news program, the Huntley-Brinkley Report. He was a professional voice-over artist and coached me over the years on how to use my voice. In my coaching practice I notice that women in particular have difficulty finding and using their voice. The voice message inspired me to develop one of my signature coaching strategies - the acronym, “V.O.I.C.E,” which stands for Values, Opportunity, Interests, Commitment, and Empowerment. Click here to hear my dad introduce the NBC Nightly News in 1977.

  

Each one of us has a unique relationship with our VOICE. We all know the fear of public speaking. For those who are not professional speakers, the experience can be extremely daunting. We can sometimes feel that same fear with our relationship with our internal voice. Quite often we’re at a loss for words when a conflict arises. We have difficulty articulating what we want in our work or life relationships. Our internal voice can help us to celebrate our successes but can also set limitations on our choices. The expression of our voice is certainly important but it’s the evolution of our inner VOICE that needs to be fostered and developed.

 

 

I often her women say, “I don’t know how to express myself or ask for what I want in my work and life”. Assess what your inner messages are as you express your outer message. Are you proud of what you do and can you feel the passion for your efforts as you tell others? Do you feel that you have to apologize for your work/life situation? Quite often the answers lie in finding your V.O.I.C.E. - your Values, your Opportunity, your Interests, your Commitment which all adds up to Empowerment.

Helping women to use their unique voice is at the core of the coaching relationship with my clients. I begin by helping you create a clear and compelling personal message by first identifying your Values. Values are the internal compass points that keep you on track and connect you to what is meaningful and authentic in your work and life. If you don’t know what your Values are, your Opportunities are scattered. You may reach for everything or nothing at all while striving for a sense of direction. Opportunities are clarified by our Interests. Opportunities are all around us but we sometimes can’t see them because our Interests are vague. With your Values to guide you, your Interests allow you to identify your passions – the things you absolutely love to do. Even if you don’t have the skills, you’ll find a way because your passion won’t let you quit. Commitment is the dedication that comes from your sense of purpose that your strong inner voice is now demanding of you. This inner confidence expresses itself in your actions and presence in all that you do.  It is then from the inner voice that you are Empowered.

In summary, addressing your V.O.I.C.E helps you to answer the Who Am I question by:

  • Identifying your core values and creating a plan to discover your life’s vision;
  • Connecting your values to uncover opportunities to put into action;
  • Exploring your interests and passion;
  • Developing your communication style;
  • Making a plan to actualize your own empowerment.

The gift I received from my dad taught me to appreciate the power of expression, the spoken word and story. These concepts form the basis of the method I use to help you discover your V.O.I.C.E. I’m sure my dad would agree.

 

Tagged in: Passion Unique VOICE
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How often do you hear, “Just go and change – you know, reinvent yourself!”  Sounds great but what if you don’t know who you are, what you want, where you’re going and how to get there? To truly reinvent and change requires self-realization and the ability to identify your unique qualities. As a result there is no “one size fits all” for managing the reinvention formula.  The best reinvention guide is to learn how to use your personal story to author your future choices and to take a look at the various roles you’ve played throughout your life story.

The roles we play as women in the reinvention story of today differ greatly from what it was like just twenty years ago.  There is more required of us today in the ever-changing blend of work and life. Think about the many times you’re required to shift gears from the supporter/nurturer to the guide/mentor in a single conversation.  Or the situation requires you to be the implementor/leader while at the same time being the listener/companion. What situations have required you to play these roles during key chapters of your story?  Quite often I hear people minimize their experiences and ignore the importance of their former roles.  Each of the characters/roles contributes to the future story and without them there would be no experiences to support reinvention.  It’s important to reflect on your journey as you traverse the reinvention path and it will require an inner examination of where you’ve been.  So how do you begin to write your reinvention story?

Ask yourself key questions about your former, present and future story.  As you answer these questions, begin by focusing on your strengths.  

  • Where do you need to make a change right now and what’s getting in the way of forging ahead with the change?
  • How can you be open to seeing new perspectives to solving problems?
  • What will it take for you to listen well, “be here now”, to focus on mutual understanding of other people’s viewpoints and welcome the sharing of information?

Once you’ve explored theses key questions you’re ready to begin working on your reinvention story.  The following strategies will guide you through the process:

  1. Know thyself - if you're looking for help in answering the question, "who am I?", the right assessment will guide you.
  2. Follow your passion.  It may be somewhat of a cliché but if you’re not doing what you love, what’s the point?
  3. Identify the tools, resources and the support you’ll need to target your hopes and dreams.
  4. How have your skills evolved?  Where did you start? How did you develop your skills?  What skills do you need for your future story?
  5. Create an effective action plan by establishing clear targets.
  6. Develop a communication strategy to ensure that your documentation represents what you want your story to be.

Once you "know" yourself, then you can "be" yourself in all you do.  In other words, your reinvention story will be unique and it will come to life as long as you integrate your evolving story with your experiences and your passion. In this way, your authentic self shines through in everything you do.  Explore this blog post for a great story on four women who have reinvented in their own way.  So now go and reinvent yourself…or at least take the first step.

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